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, but to shape the preferences of tunisia and to so let's tunisia civil society as it has been a narrative of -- but it is also the narrative of, another wants to islamize tunisian society from the bottom up, but that tunis wants to represent a modernist nationalist ethos. now we're not talk about ben ali but legitimacy, the reference has gone back, and those two parties look at the other one as having undemocratic intentions. and it is very in fact when you look at both parties, it is very difficult to evaluate those intentions. and that's to a thing for both of them. and so i would like to rebalance a little bit the way those two parties have been presented in particular by the media, and while they are, in fact, confronting each other on the political scene, there is no institution building. that is made, that is shaped. and so in a few days on octobe october 23 we are supposed to have the first draft of the constitution. we don't know what's going to happen after october 23. was a constituent assembly continue its work? that's not sure. but what we see is too big polls, i want to shape
highlighted by a recent rate case -- rape case. >> the case has attracted intense scrutiny in tunisia. a young woman has accused two policemen of rape. they are under investigation, and her complaint led to a countercharge. the state prosecutor has accused her of indecent behavior. for many here, the case is a backward step for women's rights in post-revolution tunisia. this case is important for all tunisian women, and things are especially bad for women who are victims of violence. many will be too scared to press charges. this woman provides advice to victims of domestic violence at the office of tunisian association of democratic women. she says more and more women are coming to her since the revolution. women are developing the courage to seek help, but she says many men are abusing their newfound freedoms. >> women tell us what their husbands are saying to them. the men say they can do what they want and as soon they will have the right to have four wives. >> tunisian is changing -- mosques in many poor areas now host conservative preachers. the sec wants to establish a theocracy in tuni
, run out of town wherein tunisia and yemen, certainly also somewhat in egypt there was an exit strategy for them. could you talk about the supporters of assad, and they see their backs to the wall, and do they have to fight to the death or they're going to be killed in other ways? is there any way out of it? >> yeah, it's a big problem. basically, the regime is just feeding the alawites, these people really feel like their back is against the wall, and they're going to be slaughtered. and it's just a doomsday scenario for them. the alawites. the other minorities, you know, you're talking about christians, many christian groups -- >> what's the percentage of the christian population? >> i can't -- i think we're talking about between 10 and 12%. >> so it's significant. >> no, it's not a small population. it's pretty big. and you're talking -- it's not cohesive because, you know, you're talking about greek orthodox, you're talking about syrian christians, you're talking about small numbers of protestant and what not. so these groups and also the drews, they've supported the regime. their m
these militias to heal and provide security for all of its citizens. consider tunisia, the birthplace of the arab revolution. last year, an islamist party won a plurality of the votes in an open, competitive election. i know some in washington took this as an omen of doom, but these new leaders formed a coalition with secular parties and promised to uphold universal rights and freedoms, including for women. and the united states made it clear that we would be watching closely and would assess the new government by its actions, not its words. this past february in tunis, students and civil society activist shared with me their fears about extremists seeking to derail their transition to lasting democracy, but also their hopes that responsible leaders and accountable institutions would be strong enough and willing enough to turn back that challenge. and indeed, we have seen an intense debate play out and tunisian society. for example, early drafts of the new constitution labeled women as complementary to men, but tunisia's act of civil society strong objections and eventually the national constitue
moving forward. there's a kind of civilian activism which is superior to egypt, tunisia, and certainly morocco. and the thing that most concerns me right now and doesn't concern most libyans was the attack on the shrines. i visited four of the spots in the medina where the shrines have been flattened. there have been 40 attacks in tripoli and hundreds across the country, and most libyans dismiss this as, you know, buildings being attacked, you know, big deal, you know? nobody died. but it's much more significant because the salafis are starting there, and they are unearthing 400-year-old graves and smashing quranic verses and just gutting these places, and in one place the madrassa i visited, he had fled to tunisia because he was fearing for his life, then they attacked a greek orthodox priest, so they're starting to attack christians. the thing that concerned me most was the fact that most libyans didn't care about the attacks on the shrines, and i found that problematic because when you start looking at what's actually going on there, this is the first part of a worse trend, um, that
to the new president of indonesia. -- of tunisia. >> is it fair to say you face the job of building the government almost from the foundations? >> yes, of course. happens when you have a dictatorship, it destroys the social system, like the press. this will take a long time. >> that is the new president who works in the same palace where a dictator ruled this country for more than 20 years. >> where were you? >> tunisia. we went from there through libya to cairo over the course of two weeks. try to follow up on the events of the arab spring. this is a story that compelled world and was a great interest to me. i had been in egypt before. i wanted to understand the next chapter of that story. the tv cameras were there in different places around the arab world. there was a story that was at least as important going on at that moment. people's lives. we had contact along the way. a great deal of that trip, by design, was improvisation. who did we need and what did we see? >> how did you travel? >> by a series of cars. we had a driver in each country. you could drive overseas in a confli
for all of its citizens. consider tunisia, the birthplace of the arab revolution. last year and islamist party won a plurality of the votes in an open, competitive election. some in washington took this as an omen of doom but these new leaders formed a coalition with secular parties, and promised to uphold universal rights and freedoms including 4 women. the united states made it clear we would be watching closely and would assess the government by its actions, not its words. this past february, students and civil society activists shared with me their fears about extremists seeking to derail their transition and lasting democracy but also their hope that responsible leaders and accountable institutions would be strong enough and willing enough to turn back that challenge and indeed we have seen an intense debate play out in tunisian society. for example, early drafts of the new constitution labels women as complementary to men, but to nietzsche's active civil society raised strong objections and eventually the national constituent assembly amended to recognize women's equality. society
this country for more than 20 years. >> where were you? >> tunisia. we went from there through libya to cairo over the course of two weeks. try to follow up on the events of the arab spring. this is a story that compelled world and was a great interest to me. i had been in egypt before. i wanted to understand the next chapter of that story. the tv cameras were there in different places around the arab world. there was a story that was at least as important going on at that moment. i want to get a glimpse of people's lives. we had contact along the way. a great deal of that trip, by design, was improvisation. who did we need and what did we see? >> how did you travel? >> by a series of cars. we had a driver in each country. you could drive overseas in a conflict zone or a troubled country, but you would not be wise to do that. a local driver who knows where he is going and talks with the armed men at checkpoints and says hello to them and smooth things out -- >> how many people with you? >> one producer, one photographer, a driver in each country, and an interpreter in each country. it is a ca
contestation these days is actually, probably -- just to pull a number out of the hat -- 90% in tunisia is economic and social related, and 10% is modern islamist related, but to read the international press, you'd think it was the exact opposite. um, now on -- just briefly since i have from a national crisis group, a quick recap. eighteen countries were shaken by the arab spring in ways that any other year or two would be front page news, but a lot of the stories were kind of drowned out in the cacophony of the change. it's also been very, very bloody, and i think that plays into the narrative you heard this morning of why there was relate since in -- reticence in algerian -- [inaudible] for those keeping score, you know, i heard a long time about how international intervention in syria had to be avoided and that the libya model was a disaster, but for those keeping score, syria's just passed libya in terms of a consensus figure on death. we're over 28,000 now, and it sort of, for me, reputes in relief the trauma of nonintervention of the o international community. um, and then the oth
an airport there with false papers, turned over to the people of tunisia, and the american authorities have not been able to have access to this man to ask him questions. your thoughts, sir. >> well, number one, it would be very disturbing if al-qaeda operatives in libya can talk to al-qaeda operatives in tunisia. that shows they have a regional effect, so if a guy from tunisia was able to come down to benghazi, libya, that means they're talking to each other in a way we haven't seen before, but due knee i tunisia, i've bee twice since the revolution. this is where the arab spring started. i know the prime minister very well. i called the embassy tonight. they'll get back to me tomorrow. i'm stunned to hear the tunisians are denying us access. i find that very disturbing and quite frankly hard to believe. i'm going to call the tunisian officials and get to the bottom of it. i'm not sure we're trying to get to the bottom of it here at home. i think the obama administration is stonewalling to congress, and misleading the american people. i've written almost a dozen, half a dozen letters to th
was referring our began, referring to islamic state. if you listen now to what is coming from tunisia and what is coming from egypt, you don't speak about i don't talk the islamic state. they're talking about civil state with islamic reference. this is what they are saying. it means religion is not going to impose a structure. having said that, are we playing with words or are we now really talking about something which is the state is a bottom-up delegation of power and religion is something, coming from on high and it has no power on the decision of the state. what is coming from the new islamist and even some sociologists are saying this is no longer islamist. this is post-islamist. i don't even know what started and when it's ending, but we have some problems here with terminology. the point is that they're referring to islam and the our critical question that we have to ask it when it comes to the prerogative of the state in which we are dealing with the principle. my point here is to say the muslim military cut should be quite clear on 69 principles, but for me are not negotiable. the fi
and tunisia today. the center for strategic and international studies is hosting this daylong discussion on the -- as the state department continues to receive criticism for its handling of the september 11th attack on the u.s. consulate in libya which resulted in the deaths of a u.s. ambassador christopher stevens and three other americans. little bit later this afternoon secretary of state hillary clinton will make remarks on politics, economics and security in north africa. we'll have it live for you here on c-span2. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] finish [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] finish [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible convers
of the 1990s following algeria's own democratic opening in 1998 which was mirrored by uprisings in tunisia, e just a minute, -- egypt, and elsewhere. the regime that reflects a figure like gadhafi, the availability of oil revenues to the centers, and the security apparatus allowing free expression and political participation which in 2011 avoided excessive use of force in containing public demonstrations and rioting in algier. while they are plausible explanation and point to algerians's exceptionalism, i feel there's a lack of reliable information on the diversity of views that algerians hold of their system of government, of their history, and of their preferred path forward. the inner workings of their politics is opaque and constant source of debate and speculation, even within political connected circles. i think analytic modesty is called for, and, after all, it would have been plausible to explain away the upheaval in tunisia in late 2010, for example. instead, i think we might ask what does instability look like in algeria? there does not appear to be a sizable appetite among algerian
of these ventures are carefully selected opposed to countries like egypt and tunisia, the syria regime is careful to limit northern direct investment in way, shape, or form. you find mercedes, four seasons hotels and so on, you find them, but in smaller numbers always connected to some sort of deal whereby the government has some criminal, if not over the ownership of the department, but the usage rights. >> host: so how has the government made this system inefficient? what has caused the inefficiencies? >> guest: the inefficiencies really are a function of how economic decisions were made based on the interest of network members rather than on a broader economic strategy that charted a future for the country based on its resources, endowments, human, and other resources, and in the end you had what i call this circumliberallization process where the benefits of the liberalization process were siphoned off by networks opposed to being spread out into society, and in the end, these tailored policies became so ram participant they started -- rampant, they started to produce outcomes, and you had th
him over to tunisia. >> cnn has obtained an e-mail that details within eight hours of the attack in benghazi, that the shelter location was under attack by mortar fire, presumably the second compound where the navy s.e.a.l.s were eventually killed. and this is -- it appears to be more evidence that administration officials were in a position to know a lot about the attack in real time. >> they did know that there were mortars being used. if officials come out with a tread of information like that, and then they come out and in two days there is more to it. they don't like to operate that way. they like to have the big picture and come with an assessment as opposed to strings of information. that's one of the reasons it didn't come out earlier. >> i assume there were debriefings, and i assume they would have taken place, within 24, 48 hours or so after the attacks with the survivors, and why that information, that there wasn't, in fact, protests before the attacks why that didn't get disseminated quicker. i don't know the answer to that. >> you have to remember, the u.s. is at a h
incideet. an - assault played out in immlar eighboring tunisia. immlar us embassswas ransaaced, with then, a second symbol of - ussinfluence, the american the chairman ffthe house - intelligence committee, who ii routinely briefed on the &pinvestigation, belieees the groop ansar al-sharia, which meansssuppprters of islamic laa. rrgers says: same involved. but same peoole organization cleaaly they the momentum of 9//1 clearly 667 pm on september 11, the whitt house situation room, was alerted, in this state departmenntemail that quote embbssy tripoli eporrs the grouppansar al--haria claimmd responsibility oo facebook and ttitter. while tte administration has dissiised social medii, the nly suusecc ansar al-sharia. of - second suspeet, a liibyn, has been kiiled in caaro after he rigged his apartment with explosives nd exchanged ggnfire with egyptian authortiis. fox news ps also told a third suspect is belieeed to have fought for faaing growing crutiny are o - the ciaadirector david petraeus, tthedirector of clapper and their initial ames ass
talal. she has also recently visited libya and tunisia, and i look forward to hearing the reflections on what is being done in these countries. also joining us is professor mark gold been. the professor is also subject matter expert on diplomacy and religion, political and military figures. he has been working on religion and peacemaking in the arab- israeli conflict for more than 30 years. also and in spirit -- expert on peacemaking strategies for conflict in which religion and culture play a role. recently, he worked with the syrian and afghan religious actors conducting research on value as they apply to international problems of globalization, class of cultures, development, social justice, and conflict. i have been so fortunate to work with him as part of a religious and foreign policy working group, one of the five working groups established by secretary clinton ' dialogue with society. lastly, we are joined by the legislative and policy analyst for the muslim public affairs council. we are thrilled that you have priestley stepped in for harris, who unfortunately, could not be w
news of the successful revolts in tunisia and egypt spread, the long-oppressed sunni majority believed their time had finally come. in largely peaceful demonstrations across the country, syrians defied their president, in spite of increasingly brutal attacks by the police. the center of resistance was the town of hama, where bashar's father had famously crushed a sunni rebellion almost 30 years earlier. >> the regime has a playbook. if you're faced with a crisis, go back to the playbook and see what we did the last time we got through a crisis. so the last time they got through a similar crisis was hama. so you have a protest. you have an uprising. you suppress it. the playbook does not say negotiate with the protesters, so there's no negotiation. >> that one very high-ranking turkish official told me that what's going on inside the leadership is that bashar's mother herself is telling him that these are the same events, that they remind her of what happened in the late '70s and early '80s. and her advice to him is that he has to act like his father. he has to be strong, he has to be d
as it was happening on his social media websites. we know that officials detained him and turned him over to tunisia. >> cnn has obtained an e-mail that details within eight hours that the shelter location is under fire where the navy s.e.a.l.s were veeventually killed. they were in a position to know a lot about the attack in realtime. >> they did know that there were mortars being used. with the threat of information like that, and that is only one piece of the picture and days later they find out that there was more to it. it puts officials into a position of getting more information. they like to get the big picture and i think that is one of the reasons why it didn't come out earlier. i still don't understand, is that i assume there were debriefings of those who survived the attacks. and i assume those would have taken place within 24, 48 hours or so after the attacks with the survivors and why that information that in fact there wasn't a protest why that didn't get disseminated quicker. >> well, you have to remember that the u.s. was at a huge disadvantage because they didn't have their own pe
the understanding and the university. manal omar has also visited egypt and tunisia and i look forward to hearing what's been done in these important countries. also next to her is professor marc gopin of george mason university who's been part of our working group and he is a professor of world religion, diplomacy and conflict resolution and the director of the center on world religions, diplomacy and conflict resolution. professor gopin is also a subject matter expert on diplomacy of religion, political and military figures. he's been working on religion and peacemaking in the arab-israeli conflict for more than 30 years. also in expert on peacemaking strategies for complex conflicts in which religion and culture play a role. recently he worked the afghan religious actors involved in peacebuilding and conduct research of values, dilemmas as they apply to international problems and globalization, clash of cultures, development, social justice and conflict. i have been so fortunate to work with him as a part of the religion and working for them policy working group, one of the five working groups
, tunisia, marked an anniversary today with rival demonstrations. it's been one year since an islamist party took power in tunisia's first election since a longtime dictator was ousted. pro- and anti-government supporters gathered today outside the national assembly building in tunis. they waved signs and chanted slogans at one another. we are here to celebrate the first election of the constituent assembly, the first time in the history of tunisia. the day is considered as the second independence. the first time the tunisian people practicedded the election in a transparent way with the world as a witness. >> sreenivasan: opposition lawmakers boycotted a special legislative session marking the anniversary. they accused the islamist government of failing to achieve the revolution's goals of "jobs, freedom, and dignity." the emir of qatar made a landmark trip to gaza today. it was the first visit by any head of state since hamas seized control there five years ago. gazans lined the main road to gaza city, as the emir waved at them from his car. he also met with hamas leaders and urged them to
of being involved in the u.s. consulate in libya is now in custody in tunisia. he's from tunisia. according to "the daily beast" he report posted reports on -- he reported daily reports. the u.s. tracked him after he left libya for turkey. he was detained in turkey and then tent to tunisia. that's where he's awaiting trial. so far, u.s. officials have not been able to question him. >>> "reuters" are reporting officials at the white house and the state department were told two hours after the attack on the libyan ambassador that an islamic group claimed credit. one of the e-mails obtained from government sources, it's report, was that they took responsibility for that attack. >>> a new poll shows that the latest doe bait did not affect voters' opinions. 47% say president obama was the winner of the doe bait. while 31% say mitt romney won. but the president's favorability only increased to 1% and it was pretty much the same for romney whose paverrability picked up to 54%. the candidates are on a campaign -- favorability picked up to 54%. the candidates are on a campaign blitz today. >>> back
then detained him and turned him over to tunisia and now he's being held in tunisia by tunisian authorities. >> cnn has also obtained an e-mail that indicates that within eight hours of the attack on the main compound in benghazi a u.s. official there was telling the state department and white house officials that the shelter location is under attack by mortar fire, presumably the second compound we're talking about where the navy s.e.a.l.s were eventually killed. this appears to be more evidence the administration officials were in a position to know a lot about the attack in real time. >> you i think this raises a really interesting point. they did know there was mortars being used. so they knew there was a military-type attack. however, if intelligence officials come out the day after the attack with a thread of information like that and that's only one piece of the picture and then they go public with it and two days later they find out there's more to it, it really puts intelligence officials in a position of having to go back and forth with every new bit of information they get and th
in tunisia -- that is the collapse of a four- year policy on the middle east. rather than make a serious speech connecting the dots and talking about exactly that, the collapse of the policy, the result of a naive approach to tyrants in the region, he does one drive by shot, which was accurate but only one, and then he gives a speech to the clinton global initiative about reforming foreign aid, for god's sake. there was a huge opportunity missed. the core problem is this un willingness to go large, to go big. he seems reluctant to do it. >> nina? >> i will not take on charles on the merits of the arguments, although i agree that a major foreign policy speech -- i don't think what a change things, but it would make him look like a more serious person in some ways. but i think that 47% tape was lethal. now, he has not lost, and barack obama is not a great campaigner, and when it is in practice, he is a pretty good debater. -- mitt is in practice, he is a pretty good debater. but because the 47% video was truly genuine, because it was him talking and not knowing he was taped, and played int
filed a complaint. this case is under way in the north african nation of tunisia. so now hundreds have taken to the streets of tunis to show support for this women and voice the outrage at authorities who they say are trying to publicly shame and intimidate this woman. first of all, explain how this actually started. i understand the woman was with her fiancee in a car and then the police show up. >> reporter: that's right. this happened only a few weeks ago. according to this women, three police showed up and two put her in the car and then they took turns raping her. the third police officer stayed with her fiancee to extort money from him. she actually explains this in an interview but her identity is protected. take a listen. >> translator: they raped me for an hour and 15 minutes after driving. at the end we reached a cool next to a factory. the third policeman is standing next to it. i asked them to let me go. the policeman said we'll fabricate your charge of adultery in a will spend years in prison. then he said to my fiancee what can you pay us? >> reporter: the incredible thin
of political turmoil and violence you have seen in other countries, libya, egypt, tunisia, neighboring syria, and many are worried that the violence we have seen in the north in syria might be repeated here in jordan. there has been no sign of that so far, and certainly, there are no calls for the monarchy to step down. >> we want a government who will talk to the people. parliament must be chosen by the people of jordan. we are not against a king. we are protesting the way that the government and the parliament is performing. >> as many as 10,000 people took part in the protests today. the protests were by and large peaceful. at one stage, it seemed there were almost as many police and soldiers as protesters. we have seen at the tensions that have led to so much bloodshed, and that is perhaps why the muslim brotherhood, which was behind today's to ministration, said it will take part in the electoral process if the king delivers the electoral reforms he has processed. >> from protests in jordan to libya now where this week, a team of fbi agents arrived in benghazi to investigate the assault
, tunisia and elsewhere over the anti-muslim video. reports in the consulate about contradictions outside the consulate saying there was a protest. intercepted information, planned attacks, linked to the al-qaeda off-shoot. >> this rush to judgment during a presidential campaign i find it to be troubling and i find it to be very distasteful. >> reporter: ambassador stevens wrote this cable on september 11th, the day he was killed, warning that libyan security was too weak. still, tonight intelligence officials tell them they had no idea the attack was planned, sticking with earlier assessments, that the attackers only struck after hearing about the violence in cairo. >> we'll hear more about this, as we said, andrea mitchell, thank you, in washington. >>> as recently as yesterday, the head of tourism in lebanon was angry at this past episode of the popular tv show "homeland," for portraying beirut then, an explosion of violence after what was a peaceful run there. a massive car bomb where some fear that the war in syria is spreading. eight people are dead, our report tonight from stephani
on the streets today. they see the success of their fellow brother the members in egypt and tunisia and libya and it wants to get freedom for themselves. the jordanian king dismissed parliament last night and called for new elections. how representatives the elections -- how representative the elections will be is yet to be seen. >> the elections will be carried out under the current auspices. how are the protesters responded to the dissolution of parliament and that called? >> the move last night by the king may have placate some people. there were going to be counter demonstrations by supporters of the king and those opposed to the muslim brotherhood. we have not had these two sites clashing in the sense of-center of the old city yet. the demonstrations have been -- in the center of the old city. no one is calling for the overthrow of the monarchy itself. they are calling on the came to make these reforms when he appoints the next government and to make sure the parliament is a genuine representative body and not just the tribes that support the monarchy, but those who support the muslim br
that authorities in tunisia have arrested a man possibly connected to the deadly attack in benghazi last month. and tonight, more e-mails about the attack are making news. our report from chief foreign affairs correspondent, andrea mitchell. >> reporter: as a possible suspect for the benghazi attack was being questioned, critics disclosed e-mails obtained by nbc news. the first alert read, embassy tripoli reports approximately 25 people, fired shots, explosions heard as well. ambassador stevens and four embassy personnel are in the compound safe haven. it said a friendly militia was helping to fight off the attack. soon, another said it was over. the fighting in benghazi has stopped, the compound cleared. a response team on site, attempting to locally personnel later, a known terror group was said to be linked. nbc tripoli reports the group claimed responsibility on facebook and twitter and has called for an attack on nbc tripoli. the next day the same terror group denied they were involved, causing more confusion. >> you know, posting something on facebook is not in and of itself evidence, an
that authorities in tunisia have arrested a man who may be connected to last month's deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. meanwhile, there are reports an egyptian militant also suspected of involvement has been killed in clashes in cairo. >>> the fbi and u.s. postal service are investigating reports of fraudulent letters being sent to florida voters in at least 28 counties questioning their citizenship and their eligibility to vote. >>> pakistani police say nine people have been arrested in connection with the shooting of malala yousefzai, the 15-year-old activist who spoke out against the taliban. the main suspect is still at large. >>> scientists in oregon say they have created embryos with genes from one man and two women using a controversial technique that could one day prevent babies from inheriting certain incurable diseases. researchers point out the embryos are not being used to produce children. >>> and some good news for all of us who call earth our home. government scientists say the hole in the ozone layer over the antarctic is the second smallest it's been in the p
in good hands? >>> stories making news this morning. u.s. officials confirm that authorities in tunisia have arrested a man who may be connected to last month's deadly attack on the u.s. consulate in benghazi. meanwhile, there are reports an egyptian militant also suspected of involvement has been killed in clashes in cairo. >>> the fbi and u.s. postal service are investigating reports of fraudulent letters being sent to florida voters in at least 28 counties questioning their citizenship and their eligibility to vote. >>> pakistani police say nine people have been arrested in connection with the shooting of the 15-year-old activist who spoke out against the taliban. the main suspect is still at large. >>> scientists in oregon say they've created embryos with genes from one man and two women using a controversial technique that could one day prevent babies from inheriting certain incurable diseases. researchers point out the embryos are not being used to produce children. >>> and some good news for all of us who call earth our home. government scientists say the hole in the ozone layer
the election. >>> a suspect is in custody in tunisia for the deadly raid on the american consulate in benghazi. reporting another suspect in the attack was killed in a shootout in cairo. new information continues to come out about what american official it is knew when about the attack. e-mails sent within 20 minutes of the raid say approximately 20 armed people fired shots, explosions have been heard as well. and 20 minutes later an e-mail to the situation claimed al shariah claims responsibility for benghazi attack. yesterday secretary of state hillary clinton said the e-mail about al shariah was far from conclusive. >> you know, posting something on facebook is not in and of itself evidence. and i think it justund undersco how fluid the reporting was at the time and continued to be for some time to be. what i keep in mind is four brave americans were killed. and we will find out what happened. we will take whatever measures are necessary to fix anything that needs to be fixed. and we will bring those to justice who committed these murders. >> the militant group in question those e-mails has
that maybe there were individuals who were took part in this attack that were from tunisia and libya. now you know, there's an interesting aspect of that. that means if it's true, that al qaeda is now capable cot the region. >> when he is saying tunisia and libya, tunisia and iraq, there are possible terrorists from tunisia and iraq involved in this benghazi. jennifer griffin special operations team operating in central europe had been moved to sigonella airbase but they were told to stand down actually and that a second force, specializing in counterterrorism rescues was on hand as well as sigonella. there was a team that moved in from tripoli but they were held up for some 45 minutes in benghazi. did not make it in time to intervene or rescue the two former navy seals. this is all developing. i mean minute by minute. and we are covering every moment of this. we are trying to get the newest revelations as a part of this hour special that is going to run this weekend. we promise we're going to get the newest stuff on and hopefully we'll get it all in and we'll make it in time to make slot as
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